etspiritusvitae:

rosiesays:

Oppression is cooking being “women’s work,” while the overwhelming majority of top restaurant chefs are male.

Oppression is fashion being a “silly girl thing,” while the top earning designers and CEOs in fashion are male.

Oppression is reducing women to consumers profiting a male system, even in fields that we supposedly dominate.

this is so fucking important.

(Source: regular-snowflake)

johndarnielle:

pharrfromheaven:

fishbulbsuplex:

El Hijo del Santo vs. Negro Casas

I used to have this photo on my MySpace wall about a decade ago. Probably my two favorite luchadores. Just a great photo of Santo’s wild dive on Casas. 

El Hijo del Santo playing for keeps here

johndarnielle:

pharrfromheaven:

fishbulbsuplex:

El Hijo del Santo vs. Negro Casas

I used to have this photo on my MySpace wall about a decade ago. Probably my two favorite luchadores. Just a great photo of Santo’s wild dive on Casas. 

El Hijo del Santo playing for keeps here

These two.

(Source: fyeahhbogirls)

TIM GUNN’S REACTION HERE IS THE ABSOLUTE CRUX OF THIS FREAKING SERIES I THINK. 

TIM GUNN’S REACTION HERE IS THE ABSOLUTE CRUX OF THIS FREAKING SERIES I THINK. 

electricshawty:

this tweet is everything


Lmaooo half a story ass

electricshawty:

this tweet is everything

Lmaooo half a story ass

perfect

perfect

(Source: airows)

newyorker:

Read about this week’s cover, “Fifty-ninth Street Bridge,” by Eric Drooker: http://nyr.kr/1nadMw8

newyorker:

Read about this week’s cover, “Fifty-ninth Street Bridge,” by Eric Drooker: http://nyr.kr/1nadMw8

(Source: tooshyforsoho)

putthison:

How Clothes Can Make People Treat You Differently
NPR has an interesting story about how some African Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.
"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."
So he went back in 1947, with a plan.
Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.
One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.
And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.
At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”
"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.
[…]
"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."
Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

putthison:

How Clothes Can Make People Treat You Differently

NPR has an interesting story about how some African Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.

"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."

So he went back in 1947, with a plan.

Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.

One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.

And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.

At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”

"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.

[…]

"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."

Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

newyorker:

Paul Graham visits the Garry Winogrand retrospective at the Met: http://nyr.kr/1mI66Sa

“I love that nothing stopped Garry ethically. You’re not supposed to photograph panhandlers, someone who suffers from dwarfism, or leer at beautiful strange women. He’d just put out his lens and do it.”

Top: El Morocco, New York, 1955. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Middle: Coney Island, New York, circa 1952. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Bottom: Untitled (Location Unknown), 1963. From the estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco.